Tag Archives: futurity

R&D, sf division

Science fiction is now a research and development department within a futures industry that dreams of the prediction and control of tomorrow.

–Kodwo Eshun, “Further Considerations of Afrofuturism.” CR: The New Centennial Review, Vol. 3, No. 2, Summer 2003, p. 291

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“No, it’s an alien life form.”

Via Paleofuture


You don’t even need the pretense of methodology.

“The best way to predict the future is to invent it,” computer scientist Alan Kay once famously said. I’d wager that the easiest way is just to make stuff up and issue a press release. I mean, really. You don’t even need the pretense of a methodology. Nobody is going to remember what you predicted. Nobody is going to remember if your prediction was right or wrong. Nobody – certainly not the technology press, which is often painfully unaware of any history, near-term or long ago – is going to call you to task. This is particularly true if you make your prediction vague – like “within our lifetime” – or set your target date just far enough in the future – “In fifty years, there will be only ten institutions in the world delivering higher education and Udacity has a shot at being one of them.”

Let’s consider: is there something about the field of computer science in particular – and its ideological underpinnings – that makes it more prone to encourage, embrace, espouse these sorts of predictions? Is there something about Americans’ faith in science and technology, about our belief in technological progress as a signal of socio-economic or political progress, that makes us more susceptible to take these predictions at face value? Is there something about our fears and uncertainties – and not just now, days before this Presidential Election where we are obsessed with polls, refreshing Nate Silver’s website obsessively – that makes us prone to seek comfort, reassurance, certainty from those who can claim that they know what the future will hold?

–Audrey Watters, The Best Way to Predict the Future is to Issue a Press Release


Just a reminder, folks: we live in the future.

Physicists are excited by the discovery because it opens the door for telescopes that can “see” gravity.

At the press conference, Reitze said that the gravitational waves the scientists recorded from the colliding black holes “proves that binary black holes exist in the universe.” And that hasn’t been done before. “It’s the first time the universe has spoken to us through gravitational waves,” Reitze said. “We’re going to hear more of these things.”

–Brian Resnick, Scientists just detected gravitational waves. We’ve entered a whole new world for astronomy.